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Chemistry

Stoichiometry (continued)

Excessive Limiting Reagent Calculation To ensure that the reaction occurs and to occur faster, excess reagent is usually added. Only one of the reagents will be in excess. The other reagent will be the limiting. These calculations can be identified when the problem has two reagent values.
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Chemistry

Glycides (continued)

Lactose It is a glycide found in milk and has a chemical formula C 12 H 22 O 11. It is a disaccharide resulting from the condensation of a glucose molecule with a galactose molecule. Lactose is produced only in mammalian mammary glands, being unique to milk and the sole carbohydrate of this food.
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Physics

Static and Hydrostatic Issues

Thrust (1) A 10cm³ cube weighs 50g. Placed in a water tank will it sink or float? As the block density is greater than the water density, the block will sink. (2) A 5cm³ ice sphere is placed in an aquarium with water. What is the force exerted by water under the sphere? Data: ice density = 0.92g / cm³ and water density = 1g / cm³.
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Chemistry

Oxidation Number (NOX)

To understand electrochemistry, it is necessary to know how to calculate the oxidation number of the substances involved in a chemical reaction. The oxidation number or NOX should be calculated as follows: 1) Simple Substance: ZERO (because there is no electron loss or gain). Examples: H 2 NOX H = 0 Fe NOX Fe = 0 O 3 NOX O = 0 2) Atom as a single ion: Its own charge.
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Chemistry

Marie Curie

Marie Skodowska Curie was born in Poland, Warsaw, former Russian Empire, on November 7, 1867. She was a famous character in the history of science. The first woman to win two Nobel Prizes, standing out as a university researcher, at a time when this area was dominated by men.
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Chemistry

Molar Fraction (x)

The molar fraction is a unit of concentration widely used in physical chemistry. The value of the molar fraction of the solute as well as the solvent can be found. It is a dimensionless unit. or or Then: Where: x = solution molar fraction x 1 = solute molar fraction x 2 = solvent molar fraction n 1 = solute mol n ° 2 = solvent mol n ° n = mol n ° Note: Adding 52.0g of sucrose, C 12 H 22 O 11, to 48.0g of water to form a solution, calculate the molar fraction of sucrose in this solution: To find the molar fraction of the solute ( sucrose):
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